Girls’ Gym Display 1950’s

Gym display, about 1952, at Cedar House School, a private girls school in Cambridge Street from the 1950s to 1968, site now Lidls car park

This photograph is held in St Neots Museum Ref SNEMU 2001.42.3. Cedar House School was once on the site of the Lidl Car Park, in Cambridge Street.

gym2

gym

 

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Home made water cycles

This undated photograph is held at St Neots Museum – Ref SNEMU 1995.1.1.51
This undated photograph is held at St Neots Museum – Ref SNEMU 1995.1.1.51

St.Neots has never been short of interesting characters, including Mr Rowell (clothier, High Street, St Neots) pictured here with his homemade water bicycle by the town bridge. [1]

This image is undated but is definitely before 1964 when the bridge was demolished.

[1] http://st-neots.ccan.co.uk/content/catalogue_item/mr-rowell-clothier-high-street-st-neots-with-his-homemade-water-bicycle-by-town-bridge-snemu-1995-1-1-51-no-date

Old Fire Station – St.Neots

One of the old fire station pictured below, became unused and eventually it was demolished when it became unsafe.

•Image Copyright Kevin Hale.
St Neots old fire station, Huntingdon Street, St Neots, Cambridgeshire. •Image Copyright Kevin Hale.

This Photo (taken Tuesday, 4 December, 2007) shows the natural growth that had begun to take over the engine bays.

The site became elected as the sight of the new Cinema complex – digital rendition of how it was envisioned can be seen below along with the Google Street Map of how it looks now.

Redevelopment Of The Old Fire Station site, St Neots to A New Cinema Complex
Redevelopment Of The Old Fire Station site, St Neots to A New Cinema Complex

Capture

Last manual signal box and its last signalman at St Neots Railway Station

This photograph is held in St Neots Museum – Ref SNEMU 1995.1.4.22
This photograph is held in St Neots Museum – Ref SNEMU 1995.1.4.22

This image of the Last signalman of the St Neots signal box is just lovely, but a bit bittersweet.

This signal box, opened in 1898 closed in 1977.

More information on the life of this box

” Originally possessed two boxes which dated from the introduction of “proper” signalling here in 1877… The south box was, however renewed in 1898 in connection with the quadrupling of the running lines. Interestingly, this South box (illustrated here) was built to emulate the design of the old box that had been here. Apart from the all-timber construction, it bears great similarity to the 1878 box at Shepreth.

The box contained a Saxby & Farmer (Duplex) frame of sixty levers – an example of this type of frame can be seen at Warsop Junction.

In 1925, the North box closed as an economy measure, and a few of its signals became controlled by this box, which lost the “South” suffix to its name. Around that time, Barford box (to the south) also closed, and on the main running lines (but not the goods) early automatic signalling was provided.

St. Neots subsequently had a steady existence up to the resignalling of the East Coast Main Line in the early seventies.”

Fancy Dress 1958

1958

This image taken on the Market Square looking north captures a collection of children in fancy dress, possibly for the carnival or other parade ( due to fences being put up along the pavement ).

Lady pictured in black top may be Eileen Harrington, a local nanny at the time from Silver Street, Eynesbury .

Also in the background of the shot, R.E Cadge Ltd. was a famous Clothes shop.

On the Common

onTheCommon

This picture taken April 02 1907, shows children playing on the common taken facing the now Hyde Park and Auction rooms on New Street.

When this image was taken, the Hyde Park pub was then the Cannon Inn until around the mid 1990’s as seen in the back of the shot, alongside the inn’s stabling .

You can faintly see both St. Marys church and the United Reform on the high street.

 

John Day’s brewery – The Kiln Renovation (The Oast House)

The Kiln is pictured center above and is one of only Two Remaining buildings.

“The Oast House and Maltings are 18th century buildings are all that remains of John Day’s brewery, which once covered all the area between here and the river. He acquired the brewery in 1814 from William Fowler, who built it. Most of the brewery

buildings were demolished in the 1960’s but the ‘Oast House’, which was a kiln for drying barley, was preserved and is a Scheduled Ancient Monument.” – Oast House